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In Detention: Feb. 5, 2010

Editor’s note: This is the latest blog post from a 27-year-old college graduate who ran a small construction clean-up company in Arizona until he was stopped by police for a traffic infraction in late summer of 2010. After Yogi (not his real name) was arrested and fingerprinted his information was shared with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). He was then transferred from jail to ICE custody because he lacked proper immigration papers. Yogi has lived in the United States since 1990. Deportation Nation is publishing his letters as a blog from the Florence Correctional Center, a private detention center in Arizona that is owned by the Corrections Corporation of America.

Feb. 5, 2010

Today is my third month of incarceration.

I was supposed to be the best man at my friends wedding. I was supposed to go to Vegas to watch a big fight, flight and tickets paid for. I was supposed to compete in my first Judo tournament. I was supposed to be the role model for my godson that I never had. I was a partner in two small businesses, and the breadwinner for my girlfriend and her two boys.

From in here, this whole experience seems surreal, I like many of the men in here, don’t believe imprisonment should be the way about solving this migration issue. Although at the moment I have no solution either. Al I know is that in my cell alone, there are two men who have had their green cards for 24 and 30 years, respectively, after 5 years with permanent residency people are eligible to apply for citizenship, but after 20 you would think it should be automatic.

I guess that just is another question I would like to put out in the universe.

Regardless of what your view is on the subject, I am sure you believe there needs to be some kind of reform or solution. Unmistakably, I believe that there are too many families at stake not to give an opportunity to those hardworking individuals who have spent decades contributing to this country without status. How is it just for people to be ineligible, or have to wait 15 to 20 years, to become permanent residents after all those years of struggling here. Why do people have to be arrested and humiliated to have the opportunity of a work permit? In the respect I agree with many politicians and like other folks like to say, the system is broken.

Just. Plato writes that justice is or does something for good. I cannot see incarceration, humiliation, and a systematic Gestapo tactic to do anything with just. Whether you think so or not, I am as you and you are as me, at least in the sense
that I am a person with his own feelings and notions. I want to be a part of a better society just like you. I have a set of ideals and one voice that can only say

I Am Human!

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Day 3: Capitalism: The system is broken « Voices Behind the Walls’ Journey to Life says:

[…] In Detention: Feb. 5, 2010 This is the latest blog post from a 27-year-old college graduate who ran a small construction clean-up company in Arizona until he was stopped by police for a traffic infraction in late summer of 2010. After Yogi (not his real name) was arrested and fingerprinted his information was shared with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). He was then transferred from jail to ICE custody because he lacked proper immigration papers. Yogi has lived in the United States since 1990 […]

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